Raquette's Full-Tang Nessmuk

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Raquette's Full-Tang Nessmuk

New postby Schwert on Mon 12 Jan 2004 18:45

The Full-Tang Dale Chudzinski (Raquette) Nessmuk was let out of the house again this weekend to assist with some yard chores. I needed to strip the branches off my Christmas tree and peel the pole. I normally keep the pole with the full intent to turn it into a walking stick at some point. (I currently have last years pole in the garage awaiting). :oops:

I first decided to use the Full-Tang Nessmuk to shave and split some small wood to fire up my Kelly Kettle. I decided to attempt to make the fire with my real Flint and Steel if possible. The Nessmuk shaved the seasoned ,but wet, alder sticks extremely well and was used to baton a couple of 1” diameter sticks into quarters. My wood supply was nearly soaked from all the rain we have had lately, but I had reserved a dry cedar split to get this wet wood going.

First we begin with the Full-Tang Nessmuk, this time in outdoor light. Again, this is a thin bladed tool with excellent ergonomics of the wood scales, and excellent blade geometry for shaving the wood. Thin, quick shavings were easily done.

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I used my Hawthorn baton to split a couple of sticks. An easy tap set the blade in the wood then a few harder taps drove the blade through easily. I split these sticks both horizontally and vertically. Both were easy, but the horizontal gave better baton access to the blade. Since the Kelly likes small sticks for fuel, I chose relatively small sticks to split. I found batoning these to be both efficient and safer than holding and splitting with my GB Hunter’s Ax, which was my preferred tool to date. The shavings were also very easy, but I still would normally use my GB ax for this task.

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After splitting and shaving.

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With Firesteel, flint, charcloth and small tinder nest.

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One of my attempts to catch the FireSteel spark in char. I was not successful, once again in blowing this to a coal to ignite the tinder nest. I was nearly there, but just could not do it. I am going to blame my poor piece of char…..

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Because I wanted a cup of tea, I turned to my reliable Modern Swedish FireSteel and a piece of Vaseline Cotton tinder….of course, one good pull and spark and flame.

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I transferred the tindernest to the Kelly Kettle fire pan and

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added my dry cedar kindling.

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Once going I added more shaving and splits and a few minutes later I had my boiling water for tea.

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I ended up messing with the Kelly Kettle and taking photos until nearly dark where I finally turned my attention to the actual chore of disposing of my Christmas tree. I removed the branches of the tree with a hand pruner and stripped the bark with the Nessmuk. This thin bladed knife with that great curve was like using a small drawknife on the bark. This was a Nobel Fir tree, still in very fresh state so the bark just flew off the pole.

Using this Nessmuk version was very enjoyable for fire making and stripping bark. Dale created a very useful, great handling tool in this knife.
Schwert
 
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New postby James on Mon 12 Jan 2004 18:52

Waow ! thanks a lot Randy!
Great pictures, Great content, Great knife Great hat ;)
I have taken the occasion to cross reference this thread from "Edged tools"
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New postby Schwert on Mon 12 Jan 2004 19:18

Thanks for the cross reference to the Edged tools. I debated its best position. This little story has several of my favorite tools or possessions in it...Kelly Kettle, Hunter's Ax, Flint and Steel, Tinderbox, FireSteel, and probably best unseen: my new Christmas Akubra....and my Christmas knickers....:wink:

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New postby James on Mon 12 Jan 2004 20:05

No doubt I like your Style ! ;)
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New postby glockfan on Mon 12 Jan 2004 20:07

Great pics! Great write-up. That is some choice handle material on the Nessmuk Dale made! I have been considering one of those since I saw them here. The choices are tought though between the antler and the full tang!
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New postby Schwert on Mon 12 Jan 2004 20:36

glockfan,

I really like the Full-Tang, however Chad's favorite is the Antler. It is a hard choice but either way these knives really are superb examples of Nessmuk's idea. The full-tang and antler examples of Chad's have different edge grinds that Dale was experimenting with....one a scandi type grind and the other more a convex grind. Both are well done and function nearly the same in my hands.

Whenever I decide to shoot more images, this Full-Tang just leaps into my hands though. I really like the way it feels in my hand. The antler is more traditional and a real looker but the Full-Tang just somehow feels perfect in my hands. But do not get me wrong, I think these are both great knives.

The large Orange version is really too big for my hands, but the blade length could be really nice for batoning larger wood etc.

As a general camp utilty knife I would be very well setup with either of the smaller Nessmuk's but I would choose the Full-Tang for myself if (when) I have Dale make me one.
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New postby Schwert on Mon 12 Jan 2004 20:39

Chad,

I too like this hat but what about the pants? You can lie if you think you need to :lol:

I actually have worn those to work :shock:

Day after Christmas and day after New Years....most people were gone.
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New postby Schwert on Mon 12 Jan 2004 22:06

OK, I understand, especially if there are oil paintings of your youthful knicker adventures....but man I think they are styling...of course, most people are very kind and avert their eyes as I trod past.

:lol:
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New postby Jimbo on Tue 13 Jan 2004 03:43

I think that pictures like that should be part of an article - totally clasic!

As for me - I like the concealed stick tang - but it's been damned cold, and that might have had something to do with things...

I happily wore knickers for mapping up in the Welsh mountains, and they worked well too. I often wonder what became of mine....
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New postby glockfan on Tue 13 Jan 2004 06:33

Randy, I must confess, I live less than 50 miles from Col. Bubbies and haven't seen anyone dressed as stylish as you around here. I think you are ahead of the curve on many accounts
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New postby racquette on Tue 13 Jan 2004 13:26

GREAT photos Randy!
They REALLY do jump right out at you.I forgot how nice the wood was on that one.Looks like the Nessmuk is getting a good workout. Thanks for all the time you have spent on these pics.
Dale

PS I am now sold on a Kettle.
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New postby Schwert on Tue 13 Jan 2004 19:29

Thanks for all the comments on the write-up and the pictures. This was a fun one to do. My stylish appearance....that is a new one.... :wink:

The Kelly kettle is one of those great supporting devices that never fails to make my afternoons shooting photos fun. Fire, boiling water, excellent steel and wood smoke what more could I ask standing in my back yard?

I can tell you that due to the amazing generosity of Chad, this fine knife will not be returning to his hands. I cannot believe my fortune, both in this great knife and in a great forum friendship.

The glint in my eye that was envy now is a spark of glee. Chad is one of the finest fellows I have never met, and Dale made one of my all-time favorite knives.
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New postby James on Tue 13 Jan 2004 19:58

I was expecting this answer , so the article was ready, I just had to push the "publish" button ;)

here it is:

http://outdoors.magazine.free.fr/s_article.php?id_article=126
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New postby racquette on Tue 13 Jan 2004 20:22

Randy
I talked to Chad yesterday morning on the phone,I knew then that the knife would be staying with you. This was before you posted the great photos and write-up.It brought a smile to my face when I saw the write-up knowing it was already your knife but you did not know it yet.I thought you might be a happy camper when you heard of Chad's generosity. Glad to see you are enjoying the knife.
Dale
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New postby Jimbo on Wed 14 Jan 2004 02:25

Unlike the case with a lot of knives, Randy - I believe that you'll see more in that one as years go by!
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New postby Schwert on Wed 14 Jan 2004 02:45

I think you are right Jimbo. I own a lot of knives (do not ask my wife), and each one means something to me. I either associate it with some memory of its acquisition, its maker, its design--whatever, but not a single one of them seems to just want to be used like this one. It is hard for me to actually describe how much this version of a Nessmuk just feels right in my hand. It just performs in my hand like nothing else I own or have ever used.

My general use of a blade like this falls pretty much into the sort of scenario outlined in the above post. Some basic wood prep for fire, food prep that would go along with that tea, and utility around the home or camp. Just all around stuff that just about any knife should be able to do, but for some reason this one just "wants" to do.

I have some high dollar knives that are superb examples of the makers art and are excellent tools, but not a one of them feels like this one. I consider myself a very fortunate person to have been able to work and photo this knife and a blessed person to now possess it.

I have to either try my hand at a sheath or get one made, so that this one can fall to a more daily use role.
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New postby Schwert on Wed 14 Jan 2004 04:06

Chad,

I know this full-tang has soul and I have found it. Each of Dale's other knives has similar energy but at the same time a different feel. I have not played with the ironwood like I have with the Nessmuk's but I assure you it speaks a similar language of purposeful intent. It fits my hand and cuts like there is no tomorrow.

I am going to try and shoot similar posts on the 2 Nessmuk's and this ironwood utility this coming weekend. I want to get these back to you for your "finding of the soul".

I just cannot thank you enough for this great knife and the opportuntity to handle and work with these others.
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New postby TedPalmer on Mon 19 Jan 2004 21:19

Schwert wrote:Chad,

I too like this hat but what about the pants? You can lie if you think you need to :lol:

I actually have worn those to work :shock:

Day after Christmas and day after New Years....most people were gone.

OK I have to ask: Tell me about your hat, please...
I too am in the pacific northwest and it looks like you have found a good hat for our weather!
thanks for your time and info!
Ted
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New postby James on Mon 19 Jan 2004 21:31

big welcome Ted!
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New postby racquette on Mon 19 Jan 2004 22:20

Welcome Ted

Glad you made your way over.
I was wondering if you joined.
Good bunch of guys here,post away.
Dale
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New postby Schwert on Mon 19 Jan 2004 22:36

Ted, this hat is an Akubra Lightning Ridge. My wife bought mine from David Morgan.

http://www.davidmorgan.com/proddetail.h ... 33-2748162

Check out others also:

http://www.davidmorgan.com/akubra.html? ... nce=154469

David Morgan is a great retailer up here north of Seattle. He is the braider of whips for Indiana Jones and Cat Women movies. His shop/catalog is funky with Filson, Akubra, Celtic items and he is just a grand guy. He taught me to braid leather and can talk your ear off. A craftsman, artisan and all-around neat guy. I may have been able to find the hat a bit cheaper etc on the web, but I had no interest in doing so.

Hat is a new model from Akubra...a bit on the fancy expensive side but nicely made and great for our weather. I have not worn mine in a soaking rain yet, but I know it will take it and snap back. I have Stetsons also but they are not quite as nice anymore IMO.

BTW goes great with my Ted Palmer Rattan cane! Perfect walking combo.

Hat, knickers and cane a styling NW man image.....OK you can laugh now.
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New postby TedPalmer on Mon 19 Jan 2004 23:13

Thanks for the welcome everyone !
I didn't realize you had one of my canes! Glad ya still like it!!
Nice hats at David Morgan's site. Wish I could try some on. I have one of his excellent Roo hide whips, very nice indeed!
thanks again.Ted
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New postby Schwert on Fri 23 Jan 2004 01:00

Ted,

I do indeed like that cane. It is my usual urban stick...looks like an old man cane but carries like a dream. I really like its light weight and flexibility. The crook is comfortable...mind you it is a cadence stick with hidden features in my hands (no defensive training).

I have one of Morgan's Bullwhips too....he is an amazing braider and gentleman.

Here is a partial image of it supporting my Grant Hawk Pony knife with my old, now retired, Stetson.

Image
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New postby TedPalmer on Fri 23 Jan 2004 01:17

Nice!
That Pony knife reminds me of an old wee hawk pattern fighter.
If your right handed; that whip in your right hand and the knife in your left is an excellent combination defensively speaking.

sing along now :
"if the right one doesn't get ya then the left one will"

ya ever get down this way, I'd be happy to introduce ya to some defensive cane work!
be safe...
Ted[/quote]
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New postby Schwert on Fri 23 Jan 2004 01:56

If you see a stranger walkin down the street with a whip, cane, hat and knickers it will be me looking for some instruction.... :roll:

I totally appreciate that offer, and I will give you fair warning. I have whipped myself in the face a couple of times, wakes you up a bit. But this whip is a testosterone maker...the cracks always bring out the best in one.

This Grant Hawk is a neat knife. He did not make many of them and now makes more modern designs with his son. It has a sort of thick blade and I could never get it as sharp as I would have liked, and for EDC has been replaced by other thinner blades, but I still like the lines and someday I will tune that edge just the way I want it. Gripability is superb with that notch.

Humming that tune right now.....
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Akubra

New postby Easy Rollins on Thu 15 Apr 2004 12:47

Randy,
About your new flash hat.Lightning Ridge is way out in western Queensland,it's an opal mining area.HTH
I love your pictures aswell.

Regards,Easy.
Easy Rollins
 

New postby Schwert on Thu 15 Apr 2004 17:55

ER,

This is a grand hat I must say. According to the local vendor, Lightning Ridge gets its name from a huge storm and flash of lightning that killed the sheepman, his dog and a pile of sheep.

It has a small oval opal in the kangaroo tail band. I like it.

Thanks for the photo comments. This was a great set to shoot.
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New postby Schwert on Thu 15 Apr 2004 23:08

Waterlander,

I have the Coober Pedy in straw but not fur. I think all Akubra's are rabbit fur, but I am not certain. I do know it works great in the rain though.

If my wife would let me I would get another Akubra, probably an open crown Bushman.
Schwert
 
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Tit for tats=hats

New postby Easy Rollins on Fri 16 Apr 2004 07:54

All Akubra hats are made out of rabbit fur,it is light and very fine.I have tried on a beaver fur D bar J hat and they weight too much.Rabbit is much lighter.
I have a few Akubras';
From the left,Overseer,Top hat is not Akubra,Ranchero,Cattleman,Stedson made by Akubra under licence-Boss Of The Plains,Woomera with ribbon added. 8)
It is hard wearing and should last you for years.Don't leave them on the parcel tray of a vehicle in the sun,the leather(kangaroo) sweatband will shrink with the heat.HTH


Image
Easy Rollins
 

New postby James on Fri 16 Apr 2004 09:52

ah ah, I got a snowy river and a cattleman... I admit they are great, though a bit sweaty for summer here in my taste.
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